National Nurse Anesthetists Week: 25-31

2015 Poster - Helping New Mothers

Certified Registered Nurse Anesthetists Fact Sheet

Nurse anesthetists have been providing anesthesia care to patients in the United States for more than 150 years.
The credential CRNA (Certified Registered Nurse Anesthetist) came into existence in 1956. CRNAs are anesthesia professionals who safely administer more than 34 million anesthetics to patients each year in the United States, according to the American Association of Nurse Anesthetists (AANA) 2013 Practice Profile Survey.
CRNAs are the primary providers of anesthesia care in rural America, enabling healthcare facilities in these medically underserved areas to offer obstetrical, surgical, pain management and trauma stabilization services. In some states, CRNAs are the sole providers in nearly 100 percent of the rural hospitals.
According to a 1999 report from the Institute of Medicine, anesthesia care is nearly 50 times safer than it was in the early 1980s. Numerous outcomes studies have demonstrated that there is no difference in the quality of care provided by CRNAs and their physician counterparts.
CRNAs provide anesthesia in collaboration with surgeons, anesthesiologists, dentists, podiatrists, and other qualified healthcare professionals. When anesthesia is administered by a nurse anesthetist, it is recognized as the practice of nursing; when administered by an anesthesiologist, it is recognized as the practice of medicine. Regardless of whether their educational background is in nursing or medicine, all anesthesia professionals give anesthesia the same way.
As advanced practice registered nurses, CRNAs practice with a high degree of autonomy and professional respect. They carry a heavy load of responsibility and are compensated accordingly.
CRNAs practice in every setting in which anesthesia is delivered: traditional hospital surgical suites and obstetrical delivery rooms; critical access hospitals; ambulatory surgical centers; the offices of dentists, podiatrists, ophthalmologists, plastic surgeons, and pain management specialists; and U.S. military, Public Health Services, and Department of Veterans Affairs healthcare facilities.
Nurse anesthetists have been the main providers of anesthesia care to U.S. military personnel on the front lines since WWI. Nurses first provided anesthesia to wounded soldiers during the Civil War.
Managed care plans recognize CRNAs for providing high-quality anesthesia care with reduced expense to patients and insurance companies. The cost-efficiency of CRNAs helps control escalating healthcare costs.
In 2001, the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services (CMS) changed the federal physician supervision rule for nurse anesthetists to allow state governors to opt out of this facility reimbursement requirement (which applies to hospitals and ambulatory surgical centers) by meeting three criteria: 1) consult the state boards of medicine and nursing about issues related to access to and the quality of anesthesia services in the state, 2) determine that opting out is consistent with state law, and 3) determine that opting out is in the best interests of the state’s citizens. To date, 17 states have opted out of the federal supervision requirement, most recently Kentucky (April 2012). Additional states do not have supervision requirements in state law and are eligible to opt out should the governors elect to do so.
Nationally, the average 2013 malpractice premium for self-employed CRNAs was 33 percent lower than in 1988 (65 percent lower when adjusted for inflation).
Legislation passed by Congress in 1986 made nurse anesthetists the first nursing specialty to be accorded direct reimbursement rights under the Medicare program.
Nearly 48,000 of the nation’s nurse anesthetists (including CRNAs and student registered nurse anesthetists) are members of the AANA (or, greater than 90 percent of all U.S. nurse anesthetists). More than 40 percent of nurse anesthetists are men, compared with less than 10 percent of nursing as a whole.
Education and experience required to become a CRNA include:

  • A Bachelor of Science in Nursing (BSN) or other appropriate baccalaureate degree.
  • A current license as a registered nurse.
  • At least one year of experience as a registered nurse in a critical care setting.
  • Graduation with a minimum of a master’s degree from an accredited nurse anesthesia educational program. As of Nov. 1, 2014, there were 114 accredited nurse anesthesia programs in the United States utilizing more than 2,500 active clinical sites; 32 nurse anesthesia programs are approved to award doctoral degrees for entry into practice. Nurse anesthesia programs range from 24-36 months, depending upon university requirements. All programs include clinical training in university-based or large community hospitals.
  • Pass the National Certification Examination following graduation.
In order to be recertified, CRNAs must obtain a minimum of 40 hours of approved continuing education every two years, document substantial anesthesia practice, maintain current state licensure, and certify that they have not developed any conditions that could adversely affect their ability to practice anesthesia.

How to Teach Young Children About Nursing

Nurse products for kids

Nurse Nicole visits Stuffy Bear Factory at Chesterfield Town Center, VA.

Goal:
Explore fun and creative methods to teach young children about the profession of nursing.

Objectives:
1. Develop products to introduce nursing as a future career choice to young children.
2. Display products to introduce nursing as a future career option for young children.

Nurse product line:

The nursing shortage has drawn attention to the need to encourage young children to choose nursing as a future career goal. The Adventures of Nurse Nicole is designed to help young children become aware of nursing. Helps children develop skills that are needed to become a nurse. The products will focus on the current realities related to what nurses do in the nursing profession. The tools developed are age-specific such as books titled, “N is for Nurse & Wash Your Hands.” In addition, another tool is an age-specific animated DVD titled, “Battle of the Germs.” Other items available are bears and t-shirts for children. The information reviewed in the books and DVD was used by a nurse to create teaching materials for children.

Free nursing gifts are available on site when Nurse Nicole visits Stuffy Bear factory at Chesterfield Town Center, VA or visit the website http://www.nursenciole.co

Happy Holiday Season,

Nicole M. Brown, RN aka Nurse Nicole

Creating Cancer Awareness With Breast Cancer Jewelry

If you look at the statistics, you may shudder at the number of women who suffer from breast cancer. What is even more pitiable is the fact that a lot of women fail to get the right treatment because they do not get the problem diagnosed. If the medical ailment is diagnosed in the later stages, it can be very hard to get it treated.

There is a pressing need to create the right kind of awareness because both men and women need to be educated about it. There is nothing to be embarrassed as this too is a medical ailment like most other diseases. However, so many efforts have gone down the drain for so long. Thus, the need was felt for something radical and dynamic and this is where breast cancer jewelry comes into place.

Pink is the color that speaks

The official color for breast cancer awareness is pink. You can find innumerable breast cancer jewelries that are all drenched in pink. When you are looking to buy one of those, you will be amazed at the variety which you will get.

Regardless of what your choices are, you are sure to find some of the most amazing jewelry which you will love to wear. However, the purpose of this jewelry is not just the style factor. There is greater cause for which you need to participate.

When you sport pink breast cancer jewelry; be it bracelets, rings or pins; it is sure to bring attention. Pink is not the conventional color for jewelry and this is the reason; people are likely to notice it. The main purpose of such a piece of jewelry is to let others know that you are concerned about breast cancer and you want to be the change that you wish to see.

No waves of great change can be brought unless you do your bit. You need to start of the change and sometimes it is these little things that can make the biggest difference which you need.

When you are sporting such jewelry, try and tell people about the same. It can spark a chain reaction and that will set out the right awareness campaign which is the need of the hour. Do not flinch from telling others about how painful this cancer may be and why the patients deserve love and respect rather than being looked down. It is one such disease that can occur to anyone and the amount of pain that women go through is incomprehensible.

It is the love, care and support that will give them the strength to face the turmoil and tiring times. It might look like a piece of jewelry to some, but the message which these pink bracelets or even rings and clips convey is immaculate.

Breast cancer is not a disease to be ashamed of. If you can get it diagnosed in the earlier stages, the chances of it being treated increases manifold. Do your bit today. By buying and wearing this jewelry, you can educate people about the need to create awareness and contribute to it. Do not shy away from your duties.
For ideas, please check out these websites!!

http://beverlyhillssilver.com/sideways-breast-cancer-ribbon-necklace.html
http://www.pinkribbonshop.com/

Books by Nicole M. Brown

The Adventures of Nurse Nicole: N is for Nurse

The Adventures of Nurse Nicole: N is for Nurse

The Adventures of Nurse Nicole: Wash Hands

The Adventures of Nurse Nicole: Wash Hands

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