Nurse Nicole Holiday Book Giveaway

Nurse Nicole Holiday Book Giveaway

Nurse Nicole Holiday Book Giveaway

HOLIDAY BOOK GIVEAWAY ALERT!
Visit http://bit.ly/1xU8Im8 to enter to win a free autographed copy from The Adventures of Nurse Nicole – N is for Nurse!! No purchase required!! Please share with your friends – you get an extra entry into the contest if you do!!

How to Teach Young Children About Nursing

Nurse products for kids

Nurse Nicole visits Stuffy Bear Factory at Chesterfield Town Center, VA.

Goal:
Explore fun and creative methods to teach young children about the profession of nursing.

Objectives:
1. Develop products to introduce nursing as a future career choice to young children.
2. Display products to introduce nursing as a future career option for young children.

Nurse product line:

The nursing shortage has drawn attention to the need to encourage young children to choose nursing as a future career goal. The Adventures of Nurse Nicole is designed to help young children become aware of nursing. Helps children develop skills that are needed to become a nurse. The products will focus on the current realities related to what nurses do in the nursing profession. The tools developed are age-specific such as books titled, “N is for Nurse & Wash Your Hands.” In addition, another tool is an age-specific animated DVD titled, “Battle of the Germs.” Other items available are bears and t-shirts for children. The information reviewed in the books and DVD was used by a nurse to create teaching materials for children.

Free nursing gifts are available on site when Nurse Nicole visits Stuffy Bear factory at Chesterfield Town Center, VA or visit the website http://www.nursenciole.co

Happy Holiday Season,

Nicole M. Brown, RN aka Nurse Nicole

Book Review: “Nursing From Within” by Elizabeth Scala

Book by Elizabeth Scala

Book by Elizabeth Scala

Spiritual Practice Nurse Elizabeth Scala is a nurse, Reiki Master, healer, certified coach, facilitator, teacher, author and speaker. Her latest book, “Nursing From Within: A Fresh Alternative to Putting Out Fires and Self-Care Workarounds”, is her own prescription for reinvigorating your nursing practice with heart, self-love, balance and magic.

There are three major groupings that nurses struggle with:

Self –Nursing is hard work. It’s physically demanding. It’s exhausting.
Even when you’re off you’re thinking about work or bringing work home
with you. Nursing is a labor-intensive job.

Others – While nursing is hard for you, you know how challenging it can be to work in a team. Not just the coworkers- but the patients. Patients are also getting older, sicker and much more acute.

Global – Nursing is the biggest group that makes up the healthcare system. This is the
age of technology. Documentation goes electronic and charting becomes time consuming and obsessive. Family members get confused on what to do next. Caregivers (that’s us) get exhausted.

Nursing from Within™ is an innovative and uplifting guide for nurses at all levels of the profession. Learn how to shift your inner perspective so you can enjoy the work of helping others, regardless of how stressful or challenging the environment you are working in may be. Are you ready to rediscover the joy and passion of nursing? ‘Nursing from Within: A Fresh Alternative to Putting Out Fires and Self-Care Workarounds’ is available now. Get your copy today by visiting Elizabeth Scala’s site, or purchase directly from Amazon.

This Book is a Must Read!!
Nicole M. Brown, RN

A calendar of the Virtual Blog Tour (In case you would like to follow along with our other nurse bloggers): http://elizabethscala.com/landing/nursing-from-within/#6

Helping Your Child Transition into September

2
Transitions happen every day in your child’s world and September, like no other month, is a time of transitions for your child. Starting a new grade. Getting a new teacher. Learning new classroom rules. Adding more homework. No matter what the transition, you can expect an added level of stress as your child adapts to the change.

When making the transition to a new grade, your child will be challenged by more rigorous academic challenges, more social demands and more responsibility. Your child will have to follow the rules, take turns, make new friends, learn harder material and try to meet the requirements of a new teacher(s).

It takes a lot of energy, focus and control to keep it together all day long at school, so most kids will be tired and you’ll see an increase in temper tantrums, whining and defiance at home. Don’t take it personally! Recognize the stress that your child is under!

The best response to stress is to provide empathy and support, help the child gain a sense of control, create rituals that provide predictability and teach your child ways to de-stress.

Way to Show Empathy:

A.) Listen – Become an “empathic listener” by listening for feelings.

o Listen for the unspoken feelings that are behind the words that are said.
o Look at your child’s body language and try to gain helpful information.
o Listen with your heart.
o Don’t be critical.
o Give your child your full attention by sitting down, looking him/her in the eye.
o Try to reflect back the feeling that you believe your child is conveying.

B.) Ask open-ended questions. i.e. What will you miss about preschool? What do you like about your new teacher? What’s the hardest part of your day?

C.) Share a story from your childhood. The point here is to share a struggle that you had and the different feelings that you experienced. If you found a process that helped you overcome the struggle, share that, too.

Another important point to understand is that transitions involve a sense of loss:

A loss of fun. “I want to play with a friend now. I don’t want to do homework!”

A loss of spontaneity. “I’m tired and I’d rather have a jammy day than get dressed and go to school.”

Or a loss of my classroom as I know it. “This teacher is different. I liked my other teacher!”

Generally, when a child feels a sense of loss s/he feels a loss of control and a beneficial strategy is to help the child gain a sense of control. So how do you do that?
A.) Involve your child in the decision. Ask your child, “What might help you feel more comfortable?”

B.) Walk your child through the process, explaining how it will go. Knowledge is power.

C.) Show visual aids such as reading books on the subject.

D.) Explain the benefits so the child can learn the positives.

E.) Slow down the pace. Give your child a chance to wind down or to say goodbye.

F.) Learn to read your child’s cues and help him/her learn to identify them, too.
Another helpful strategy for reducing the stress of changes is to create a ritual. Family rituals help your child adjust to change. A ritual can be simple or elaborate, used daily, weekly, or once a year. The reason that rituals are important is that rituals help make the world predictable and the repetition helps kids feel more secure when transitions are occurring.

Rituals that Can Help with Transitions:
A.) Develop a goodbye ritual. Develop a secret handshake with your child that’s used only when s/he leaves for school.

B.) Develop an after-school ritual. Let your child have a snack and play outside for 30 minutes before starting homework.

C.) Develop a “chit-chat” time at bedtime. Ask your child about the happy, sad, scary and frustrating parts to his/her day.

D.) Develop an end-of-the-week ritual. Have a family night every Friday night to reconnect and unwind after a busy week.

Change also increases a child’s anxiety level because there is a loss of the familiar and the uncertainty of the future so finding safe, healthy outlets for a child’s anxiety is important, as well. Teaching your child how to soothe him/herself and providing calming activities will be a great help.

A.) Increase Physical Touch – Make a conscious effort to hug and kiss more often, snuggle more or provide massage to your child.

B.) Teach a Deep Breathing Method. (Pretend that there’s a balloon in his/her tummy that s/he has to blow up. Actually use a balloon to illustrate. The technique you want to have the child use is to breathe in through the nose and breathe out through the mouth, actually moving the diaphragm while pretending to blow up the balloon with big, deep breaths.)

C.) Consider Dramatics – Let your child use his/her imagination. “Let’s pretend that you’re the fairy godmother.” Get a wand. Let’s see what the fairy godmother would do to solve this problem. Create a movie, play or story about this problem. Play “School” to see what issues your child may be facing.

D.) Spend Time Alone with the Child – Let the child pick what the activity will be and focus on your child’s needs.

E.) Laugh – Find your own ways to be silly, have a kids’ joke book on hand, do something unexpected, watch your favorite family movie.

F.) Give Your Child a Journal – Writing about a problem can release pent-up feelings in a healthy way.

In summary, there are many useful strategies that you can use when your child is faced with a transition, large or small:

o Respond with empathy recognizing that your child may feel a sense of loss.
o Help your child gain a sense of control by involving him/her in decision-making.
o Develop a ritual to create predictability.
o Offer soothing and calming activities.

Summer Allergies

pollen-allergies-sneeze-600When most people think of allergy season, they think spring. And while spring time allergens cause discomfort for over 50 million people in the U. S. alone, summer can be just as debilitating for those who struggle with summer allergens. Here are four of the most common summer allergy triggers and a solution for minimizing their effect.

Pollen-Just as in the spring, summer’s biggest offender is pollen. But by summer the trees are done with pollination and it is the grass and weeds that step up to take their place. Grass is the most popular ground cover and is next to impossible to avoid. There are many different kinds of grass that can cause problems including well known varieties such as Timothy, Red Top, Orchard, Blue, Bermuda, and Sweet Vernal.

Weeds-Weed pollination usually begins in August and can continue through late fall into November. Ragweed is probably the most well known followed closely by Sagebrush, Pigweed, Cockle weed and numerous others.

For both pollens and weeds, dry windy days are the times when the air tends to be thick with pollen. It attaches to clothes, hair and any other handy surface in hopes of finding fertile ground to begin the cycle again.

Mold-Mold occurs naturally outside and can only survive if and when it finds moisture. Landscaping that allows water to stand, or areas that don’t drain naturally, and piles of leaves are all places where these spores will thrive.

Mold spores enter your home constantly, there’s no keeping them out. And with the increased humidity in the summer it becomes easy for them to make a home in your home, particularly in places like basements, bathrooms, and kitchens.

Dust Mites-These microscopic critters love dark, warm places and feed on dead skin. Their feces contain a protein that is a renowned allergy trigger. With increased moisture in the summer the dust mite count inside your home usually rises and creates havoc in the bedroom, and more specifically, in your bed-their favorite place to be. They generally become airborne with simple every day activities such as making the bed, plumping the pillows and walking through the room on rugs or carpeting.

With these kinds of airborne triggers present in the summer time, it’s no wonder that an immune system that is sensitive to any of these irritants goes into overdrive. Coughing, sneezing watery eyes and congestion are your body’s immune system’s way of trying to get rid of what it sees as a threat.

And whereas you cannot control what’s in the air outside your home, you can mange your allergies beautifully in the summer and all through the year by filtering the triggers that cause the symptoms. Eliminating the triggers rather than constantly treating the symptoms is the most proactive and non-invasive way to effectively mange summer allergies.

Eliminate the triggers that cause summer allergies to flare now with the air purifier.

This is great information for Moms, Future Nurses and professional nurses!!

Books: Teaching Our Children about Careers

998319_242750545891154_1923223330_nWhat did you want to be when you were four years old? How about when you were 10 years old? If you are like most adults, as children the career you said you wanted to do was guided by what you’d seen in books or on television. Maybe someone in the family or the neighborhood did something that fascinated you enough to say, “When I grow up I want to be a —!”

It is never too early to expose children to careers, especially those careers that make our lives better like nursing, law or something like construction.

Christianbook.com has a great catalog of books for both parents and children. Here are some I found that could help you begin a reading program that engages and inspires questions about career choices in young ones.

For parents I found Achieving Your Dreams: Starting Early to Help African American Children Develop a Vision of Their Dream Careers by Cajetan Ngozika Ihewulezi (Tate Publishing, 2009). There is also a similar book for Latino American children.

Want to read to your small one? Lyle at the Office is a book by Bernard Waber that follows the work adventures of the Lyle the crocodile as he takes a job at an advertising agency.

Do you have a tween? Anastasia’s Chosen Career by Lois Lowry seems like a winner. This fiction book is about a 7th grader who has to do an assignment requiring research into careers.

Here are a few more books I found interesting from other sources.

Career Day by Anne Rockwell

The Berenstain Bears: Jobs Around Town

Richard Scarry’s What Do People Do All Day?

It isn’t too early to begin planting good seeds and stimulating curiosity. Hopefully, these book selections will be helpful.

Interview on PWICU with Tabitha Vinson

pwicu

Listen to my interview on PWICU on Monday, November 13, 2013 at 7:00 pm EST.  I will be talking with Host Tabitha Vinson about my books, N is for Nurse AND Wash Your Hands.

DID YOU MISS? You can listen to the program at  http://www.blogtalkradio.com/pwicu/2013/11/14/spiritual-surgeon-nicole-m-brown-rn

Interview on Spiritual Food for Thought Global Radio Show

faithabeliever

Listen to my interview on Spiritual Food for Thought Global Radio Show on Monday, November 11, 2013 at 6:30 pm EST.  I will be talking with Host Missionary La‘Tanyha about my books, N is for Nurse AND Wash Your Hands.

DID YOU MISS? You can listen to the program at  http://www.blogtalkradio.com/faith-abeliever/2013/11/11/author-spotlight-nicole-brown-annette-morton

Day 6 of Virtual Book Tour

MeetNurseNicoleVBT

It’s Wednesday, November 6, 2013 and I will be featured at the following blog today.

Written Voices Blog
http://www.writtenvoicesblog.com (click to read the interview)

This is the last blog stop of my tour so please stop by and leave a comment.

Interview on Sharvette Mitchell Radio Show

WithSharvetteMitchell

Listen to my interview on Sharvette Mitchell Radio Show on Monday, November 5, 2013 at 6:20 pm EST.  I will be talking with Host Sharvette Mitchell.  I met her in person recently at the Social Media Summit.

DID YOU MISS? You can listen to the interview at http://www.blogtalkradio.com/mitchell-productions/2013/11/05/meet-vincent-white-nurse-nicole-and-appointed.

Books by Nicole M. Brown

The Adventures of Nurse Nicole: N is for Nurse

The Adventures of Nurse Nicole: N is for Nurse

The Adventures of Nurse Nicole: Wash Hands

The Adventures of Nurse Nicole: Wash Hands

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